Jacques F. Vallee : UFOs & Remote Viewing



One of the most quoted authors in the field of Ufology, Silicon Valley entrepreneur Jacques F. Vallee discussed his work on UFO phenomena, as well as his interest in remote viewing and parapsychology. Remote viewer Paul H. Smith joined in during the conversation, noting that Vallee will be the keynote speaker at the upcoming Remote Viewing Conference in Las Vegas.

Vallee, who distanced himself from ufology for a number of years, said the study of UFOs became less focused on science and more embroiled in a debate over belief systems. He spoke about first witnessing a saucer-shaped craft in 1955, and his years working with investigator J. Allen Hynek. Over time, Vallee began to doubt the extraterrestrial hypothesis for UFOs. He looked at unusual sightings dating back centuries, where such incidents were thought to be associated with ghosts, demons or supernatural forces. The phenomena is saying we don't understand space-time, and that our universe is a subset of something else, he asserted.

Vallee discussed his long-standing friendship with Ingo Swann (considered the father of remote viewing) and their participation at SRI at the very beginning of the RV program in 1971. Remote viewing's funding by intelligence agencies such as the CIA has been both a blessing and a curse, said Vallee. Mission-oriented projects were pushed forward before the science was fine tuned, he explained.

Biography:

Dr. Jacques F. Vallee was a senior researcher at the DARPA-funded Augmentation Research Center at SRI at the very beginning of the RV program initiated by Dr. Puthoff and Russell Targ in 1971. Given his long-standing interest in consciousness research, he became informally associated with the program and is credited by Ingo Swann for suggesting the approach that led to the coordinate remote viewing protocol. In the mid-eighties, Dr. Vallee was brought back to SRI as a consultant. He was cleared for Grill Flame, went through formal training with Ingo Swann, and contributed to the methodology research that Dr. Ed May later led at SAIC. His experience spans the entire life of the program and gives him a special position as an observer and commentator on the reality of remote viewing.

Dr. Vallee also has long been interested in the UFO phenomenon and has earned the reputation of being one of the most rigorous and credible researchers in the field. He was the model for the French scientist figure played by Francois Truffaut in Steven Speilberg's classic film "Close Encounters of the Third Kind."

Wikipedia
Jacques Fabrice Vallée (born September 24, 1939 in Pontoise, Val-d'Oise, France) is a venture capitalist, computer scientist, author, ufologist and former astronomer currently residing in San Francisco, California.

In mainstream science, Vallée is notable for co-developing the first computerized mapping of Mars for NASA and for his work at SRI International in creating ARPANET, a precursor to the modern Internet. Vallée is also an important figure in the study of unidentified flying objects (UFOs), first noted for a defense of the scientific legitimacy of the extraterrestrial hypothesis and later for promoting the interdimensional hypothesis.

In May 1955, Vallée first sighted an unidentified flying object over his Pontoise home. Six years later in 1961, while working on the staff of the French Space Committee, Vallée witnessed the destruction of the tracking tapes of an unknown object orbiting the earth. The particular object was a retrograde satellite -- that is, a satellite orbiting the earth in the opposite direction to the earth's rotation. At the time he observed this, there were no rockets powerful enough to launch such a satellite, so the team was quite excited as they assumed that the Earth's gravity had captured a natural satellite (asteroid). A superior came and erased the tape. These events contributed to Vallée's long-standing interest in the UFO phenomenon.

In the mid-1960s, like many other UFO researchers, Vallée initially attempted to validate the popular Extraterrestrial Hypothesis (or ETH). Leading UFO researcher Jerome Clark[4] argues that Vallée's first two UFO books were among the most scientifically sophisticated defenses of the ETH ever mounted.

Vallée began exploring the commonalities between UFOs, cults, religious movements, demons, angels, ghosts, cryptid sightings, and psychic phenomena. Speculation about these potential links were first detailed in Vallée's third UFO book, Passport to Magonia: From Folklore to Flying Saucers.

As an alternative to the extraterrestrial visitation hypothesis, Vallée has suggested a multidimensional visitation hypothesis. This hypothesis represents an extension of the ETH where the alleged extraterrestrials could be potentially from anywhere. The entities could be multidimensional beyond space-time, and thus could coexist with humans, yet remain undetected.

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